2017-149:   The forage efficient beef cow: Investigating into the underlying physiology


Cows will vary in their body condition score, even if they are provided identical diets. This study will assess cows body condition on low-input winter diets to determine their ability to utilize the feed. This work differs from Residual Feed Intake work, as the cattle in those studies were still growing. This research considers cattle that are maintaining their health with lower-quality forages which might utilize these feeds more effectively from animal to animal. To facilitate this study, 130 pregnant heifers will be fed, and following that the cows with the highest and lowest body condition scores will be examined to determine their differences.




2017-095:   Evaluating long term benefits of genomic selection programs in beef cattle breeding programs


Researcher: Bart Lardner Funding: $24,000 This project has been developed from a project that showed that not all bulls pull their weight in a herd. This study furthers that research, to evaluate whether bulls persistently fail to perform, and whether breeding performance can be determined based on genetics.




2020-104: Investigating the Role of GDF11 in muscle and fat deposition in Beef Cattle


Researcher: Mika Asai-Coakwell Funding: $18,500 Both consumer preferences and producer efficiency are important to cattle production. Consumers are interested in beef that is tender - a trait that has been noted for years, but has not significantly improved in numerous quality surveys. The number of genes that note growth, carcass yield and meat tenderness are few, and have not been the focus of many projects. While over 60% of beef cattle graded AAA or Prime, there has been a decline in yield grade.
Dr. Mika Asai-Coakwell has indicated that one beef gene variant, GDF11, could impact marbling, backfat, and yield score while also allowing beef cows to thrive under extensive production settings with better pregnancy rates, milk composition, and weaning weights.
This research team, which includes Ms. Kathy Larson and Dr. Greg Penner, will compare the DNA of cross-bred beef cows to their body weight, age, calf birth weight, and other growth data that are economic importance. They will also evaluate feedlot calves with a variety of GDF11 variants being fed to finish with GrowSafe Bunks. Differences between purebred and crossbred cattle will be noted, as weill meat quality differences associated with these genotypes.





2017-149:   The forage efficient beef cow: Investigating into the underlying physiology


Cows will vary in their body condition score, even if they are provided identical diets. This study will assess cows body condition on low-input winter diets to determine their ability to utilize the feed. This work differs from Residual Feed Intake work, as the cattle in those studies were still growing. This research considers cattle that are maintaining their health with lower-quality forages which might utilize these feeds more effectively from animal to animal. To facilitate this study, 130 pregnant heifers will be fed, and following that the cows with the highest and lowest body condition scores will be examined to determine their differences.




2017-095:   Evaluating long term benefits of genomic selection programs in beef cattle breeding programs


Researcher: Bart Lardner Funding: $24,000 This project has been developed from a project that showed that not all bulls pull their weight in a herd. This study furthers that research, to evaluate whether bulls persistently fail to perform, and whether breeding performance can be determined based on genetics.




2020-104: Investigating the Role of GDF11 in muscle and fat deposition in Beef Cattle


Researcher: Mika Asai-Coakwell Funding: $18,500 Both consumer preferences and producer efficiency are important to cattle production. Consumers are interested in beef that is tender - a trait that has been noted for years, but has not significantly improved in numerous quality surveys. The number of genes that note growth, carcass yield and meat tenderness are few, and have not been the focus of many projects. While over 60% of beef cattle graded AAA or Prime, there has been a decline in yield grade.
Dr. Mika Asai-Coakwell has indicated that one beef gene variant, GDF11, could impact marbling, backfat, and yield score while also allowing beef cows to thrive under extensive production settings with better pregnancy rates, milk composition, and weaning weights.
This research team, which includes Ms. Kathy Larson and Dr. Greg Penner, will compare the DNA of cross-bred beef cows to their body weight, age, calf birth weight, and other growth data that are economic importance. They will also evaluate feedlot calves with a variety of GDF11 variants being fed to finish with GrowSafe Bunks. Differences between purebred and crossbred cattle will be noted, as weill meat quality differences associated with these genotypes.





2019-114: A screen for drugs that reveal Mycoplasma bovis to the bovine immune system


Researcher: Antonio Ruzzini Funding: $24,200 A successful treatment for Mycoplasma Bovis has evaded us for some time. This novel research, led by Dr. Tony Ruzzini, will study proteins released from the bacterial membrane of this disease, and use available drugs to determine if they can disrupt them, essentially removing the "cloak" that makes its treatment so difficult.




2019-006: Genomic epidemiology and rapid detection of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis infections (Johne’s disease) in Saskatchewan cattle


Researcher: Andrew Cameron Funding: $50,000 Johne’s disease reduces the ability for an animal’s intestines to absorb nutrients, causing weight loss, diarrhea, and eventually death. There are no vaccines available or effective drugs to treat animals with this Johne’s, though there are international trade risks associated with this disease. The current tests available for Johne's disease provide false positives, and are not able to detect it until the onset of the disease's symptoms. Detecting the specific pathogen is also a challenge. This study will find the DNA of various Johne's disease strains, and then develop a rapid, accurate, and cost effective diagnostic tool.




2018-135:  Comparison of immune response & respiratory disease sparing effect of homologous & heterologous vaccine programs in neonatal calves


Researcher: Nathan Erickson Funding: $17,250 Respiratory disease control research is a major priority for the SCA Board and Research Committee. This project will investigate the best vaccination protocol, based on the vaccines that are already commercially available. It will also note if different forms of vaccines (intranasal priming vaccines with injectable booster vaccines) would be more effective than either intranasal or injectable vaccine protocols alone.




2018-137:  Treatment guidance for Bovine respiratory disease: Optimizing prudent and economical antimicrobial decision making.


Researcher: John Campbell Funding: $23,000 Medicating cattle with effective antibiotics helps reduce treatment times and costs. However, producers do not often know precisely what pathogens are affecting cattle. This research will investigate if calves can be swabbed on arrival at feedlots, and the chances that they will later be ill from the same pathogens detected. It will also determine if the most common bacteria detected would affect the whole herd, and if a small sample could predict the illnesses for the entire pen.




2018-138:  Managing calves before arrival at the feedlot to reduce infectious disease, antimicrobial use & resistance: What is it worth & An Interactive Tool to Inform Johne’s Disease Control in Beef Herds: What Test, When and How Often


Researcher: Cheryl Waldner Funding: $4,888 Dynamic computer models can assess a number of different management practices, and have been used to determine best practices to achieve water quality, medical practices, and oil and gas refineries. The purchase of the dynamic modelling computer allows researchers to assess different management practices on cow-calf farms, and their impacts on treatment rates for disease, antibiotic use, resistance, and costs of production for the feedlots. It will also be used to further investigate best practices surrounding Johne’s disease.




2018-136: Use of bacteriophage-derived lysins in combatting multi-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens that cause bovine respiratory disease (BRD)


Researcher: Dongyan Niu Funding: $45,774 1) Engineer a part of the bacteriophage (bacteria-killing viruses) to specifically attack the most drug-resistant pathogens.
2)Antimicrobial resistance is increasing, and it is difficult to treat some bacteria common in bovine respiratory disease.
2) There has been success in mice and humans.




2017-147:  Mycoplasma bovis antimicrobial resistance determination by MALDI-TOF MS: feasibility and practical application pilot study.


Researcher: Murray Jelinksi Funding: $18,170 Veterinarians conduct tests to determine if the samples of bacteria will be affected by antibiotics. There are several tests already available, but faster tests to make this information more available will help provide answers more efficiently for beef producers, especially with M. Bovis bacteria which often mutate quickly. This study will determine the effectiveness of 3 different tests for antimicrobial resistance, one of which is the MALDI-TOF test. The researchers hope to provide a larger, more practical system available to more vets and their clients.




2017-146:  Enhanced Vaccine Adjuvant Platform for Nasal Administration in Livestock


Researcher: Ellen Wasan Funding: $50,000 Currently, nasal vaccines are not effective for newborn calves, as the maternal antibodies normally counteract its effectiveness. This adjuvant (or a substance that enhances a body's immune system to an antigen) would make these vaccines suitable for maternal immunization, and highly effective in newborn calves. Trials will start in the lab, and then move on to mice, pigs, and then cattle for this 3-year study.




2017-145:  Alternative Trace Mineral Supplementation Strategies for Improved Cow Performance


Researcher: Bart Lardner Funding: $30,000 Trace mineral intake can vary when they are available as free-choice to a herd. These minerals can e vitally important in order to prevent a wreck. To determine the value of injectable versions of trace minerals, 200 cows at the new Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence and 200 cows in Guelph, Ontario will be provided various sources of trace minerals, and measured for their reproductive response.




2017-094:  Development of a novel vaccine for protection against Mycoplasma bovis infections in feedlot cattle


Researcher: Jose Perez-Casal Funding: $149,788 Mycoplasma bovis is a pathogen causing respiratory disease and arthritis, among other problems. It is increasingly recognized as having an important impact on the health, welfare, and productivity of dairy and beef cattle. M. bovis diseases can be difficult to diagnose and control because of inconsistent disease expression and response to treatments and vaccines. Dr. Perez-Casal will test novel vaccine candidates against an M. Bovis challenge. This approach has already been successful in Sub-Sahara Africa against Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia.




2016-186: Effect of Ergot on Beef Bull Fertility


Reseacher: Jaswant SIngh Funding: $28,980 The effect of ergot on cattle has been studied in the past. Beef nutritionists feel comfortable
providing their cattle with a low level of ergot in feed, while higher levels of ergot can lead to large wrecks. However, Dr. Singh and his team are investigating whether even these low levels of ergot can lead to poor fertility for bulls in the year that they eat ergot and beyond. They hope to provide better recommendations to bovine nutritionists with this information, which could lead to higher fertility rates in years after ergot contaminated crops.




2016-084: A field comparison of intranasal versus injectible BRD vaccination on beef calf titres, ADG, morbidity and mortality


Researcher: Nathan Erickson Funding: $15,000 Beef producers have several vaccination choices when ensuring the health of their animals. However, concerns about efficacy have been raised, which is further complicated by various protocols recommended for each type of vaccine. Given new information available on the Bovine Viral Disease, these researchers wanted to compare live modified, nasal injectable protocols to traditional injectable vaccines and their protocols.




2020-111: Enhancing diagnostic methods for rapid and accurate detection of macrolide resistance in Mannheimia haemolytica


Researcher: Janelt Hill Funding: $20,000 Antimicrobial resistance is already an issue for beef cattle, and there is evidence of new mechanisms in the Mannheimia bacteria indicating creating additional new resistance. As Mannheimia haemolytica is resistant to the most commonly used antibitoics within the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex, more analysis to curtail this problem is essential.
Dr. Janet Hill and her team will sample 800 calves on arrival into the LFCE feedlot for two years, so that they can sequence the bacteria shown to have resistance.
While the application of this research is long-term, understanding antimicrobial resistance in a large scale will generate a much more comprehensive understanding of this problem.




2020-109: Using watering bowls to monitor the respiratory bacterial resistome in cattle by location and time within the feedlot


Researcher: Murray Jelinski Funding: $22,5000 Antimicrobial resistance is an increasingly alarming risk. Treatments for sick cattle, without knowing for certain what is causing their illness, increases resistance on farms, which then necessitates a search for other more useful drugs. It could also lead to greater beef mortality.
Easy, cost effective methods to determine which diseases are prevalent in a feedlot, as well as the drugs that will be most useful, would allow producers to target problems quickly.
Dr. Murray Jelinski will investigate how bacteria change at waterbowls over time, and note if there are any "hot spots" in the pen which could increase antimicrobial resistance. This will set up more information and resources for future projects that will note methods to prevent and treat diseases more effectively.




2020-107: Towards 1-step testing – rapid identification of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) viruses to inform vaccine use & development


Researcher: Cheryl Waldner Funding: $25,000 Bovine respiratory disease is a complex that mostly affects incoming feedlot calves. While a great deal of research has focused on the bacterial contributions, viral contributions are equally important.
Automate sequencing and bioinformatics will be used for viral BRD to reduce time and costs. The research team will also note potential of sequencing infections on arrival at feedlots, then evaluate the effectiveness of cow/calf vaccines arriving at feedlot. This in turn will help them determine the need for vaccine/protocol updates.
Ultimately, this research team, lead by Cheryl Waldner, hopes to provide 1-step rapid identification of known and emerging BRD viruses, in order to quickly and effectively treat this disease complex. Treating animals for the right infection at the right time ultimately will help reduce costs, and improve animal welfare.





2019-126:  Level of canola source fat in pregnant beef cow diets - effects on cow and calf performance


Researcher: Bart Lardner Funding: $50,000 Previous research has shown that canola fat was highly beneficial when in the beef cattle ration. This research will note the effects of canola fat on beef cows through the gestation period, and the effects on their calves throughout their lives, including slaughter.




2019-121: Strategies to address mineral nutrition in the face of poor water quality


Researcher: Gregory Penner Funding: $40,000 Sulfate toxicity is one of the most common forms of water toxicity in Western Canada. Ideally, sulfate levels should be kept below 1,000 parts per million, though recent research from the Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence have noted that the affects of sulfates in water are not clearly understood. In order to manage beef cattle health with sulfates in water, Dr. Penner and his team from across Saskatchewan and North America will evaluate an appropriate level of bismuth subsalicylate in a ration with various levels of sulfates in water in addition to other hydroxy trace minerals and injectable minerals. The costs and associated economic data will also be collected to help producers determine best practices moving forward.




2019-116:  Stocking density and feed bunk space as a risk factor for liver abscesses


Researcher: Diego Moya Funding: $20,000 Liver abscesses continue to be an issue for beef producers. According to the National Beef Quality Audit in 2016, liver discounts were estimated at $20.98/head, with a total loss of $61.2 million to the industry. Dr. Diego Moya from the University of Saskatchewan will note how cattle behavior towards practices such as slick bunks affect how the cattle eat, and the effects on their livers.




2019-115: Accelerated and targeted discovery of cellulases using high resolution meta-omes of multiple ruminant species


Researcher: Leluo Guan Funding: $35,000 Bison are able to survive on more low quality forages than cattle. Some evidence suggests the enzymes within the bison rumen allows this. Dr. Leluo Guan will determine if this is the case, and whether these enzymes can then be added as a feed ingredient for beef cattle. If this is possible, it could lower feed costs and continue to decrease the amount of greenhouse gas emissions from beef cattle.




2016-006:  Performance, Environmental and Economic Benefits of BioChar Supplementation in Beef Cattle Grazing Systems


Researcher: Bart Lardner Funding: $72,000 Biochar is a form of activated charcoal has potential to reduce methane emissions in ruminants. It has also been shown to improve manure composition. While it has shown early promise, the mechanisms involved are not well understood. This project will determine if, and at what level, biochar reduces greatest amount of emissions in grazing cattle, while also measuring the performance, dry matter intake, an economic effect of grazing cows while consuming this additive.




2019-005: The use of sensory additives to boost feed intake and immune function of newly arrived feedlot cattle


Researcher: Diego Moya Funding: $49,777 This study will determine whether feed additives like cinnamon or sweeteners help newly arrived calves adjust to feedlot bunks. As calves travelling between farms, auction marts, and back can be stressed, causing potential illnesses. To reduce this possibility, calves will be provided cost-effective flavours along with standard diets, and compared to those without the additives. Their body weight, stress levels, and health records will be compared to note any differences. The Research Committee and Board were interested in methods to reduce this stress on arrival, as cattle which turn to the feed bunks earlier are more likely to be healthy.




2018-101: Proof of concept study for the delivery of a respiratory probiotic to feedlot cattle via the feed.


Researcher: Dr Murray Jelinski Funding: $36,783 Methods to reduce the need for antibiotics are not only desired by consumers but are cost effective for producers. Probiotics have been useful in human health to reduce upper respiratory tract infections. This research will investigate if probiotics could also be top-dressed into feed so that cattle could inhale them nasally, to combat respiratory illnesses in feedlot calves.




2018-099: Butyrate as a novel functional ingredient for feedlot cattle.


Researcher: Greg Penner Funding: $34,500 Butyrate has shown to better control microbes which create methane and improve growth performance. However, these improvements have only been shown in younger animals. Dr. Penner and his fellow researchers believe that as an animal gets larger, the stomach (or rumen) might eliminate the affects of butyrate. Therefore, Penner will conduct a trial to determine if a rumen-proof dose could reach the small intestine, which could then allow better nutrient uptake, among other possibilities.




2018-097: Use of high - moisture corn products for finishing cattle and the corn stover for extensive grazing,


Researcher: Greg Penner Funding: $103,500 Practices that incorporate snaplage (corn silage that excludes the stalk and more of the leaf) has become common in other areas of North America, as it has a 10-25% greater yield than high moisture corn. The remnants of snaplage, the corn stover, could also be used for winter grazing. This research will compare snaplage to dry-rolled barley and dry-rolled flint corn, by noting its cost of production and feeding performance.




2017-003:  Addressing Livestock Water Security Through Sulphate Removal Using Bioadsorbent Materials and Modified Forms


Researcher: Lee Wilson Funding: $20,000 While the Canadian Water Quality Guidelines recommend a maximum sulphate concentration of 1,000 mg/L, many livestock producers in Saskatchewan have reported high levels of sulphates in their water. This has led to a deficiency of copper, zinc, iron, and manganese that in turn causes lower growth rates, infertility, a depressed immune response, and even death in very high concentrations. Some sulphate management practices, like adding copper to feed, can be a cost effective. However, these solutions are more adequate for feedlot cattle. Dr. Wilson’s team will create a prototype of a sulphate removal system that could also ultimately also remove phosphate as well.




2016-086: Optimizing ruminal fermentation using silage and cereal grain inclusion strategies for backgrounding and finishing steers


Researcher: Greg Penner Funding: $81,714 Backgrounding and finishing operations in Saskatchewan have several feeding options for their calves. Increasingly, corn grain and corn silage has become another option. However, there are different levels of starch and protein in these grains, which in turn have varying affects on rumen fermentation. This project is studying corn and barley so that producers understand the effects of cereal silage and cereal grain feeding strategies in terms of growth performance, feed conversion, rumen fermentation, and nutrient digestibility. Economic outcomes will also be analyzed to help producers increase their profitability.




2020-113: Evaluation of animal variability in fibre digestion and strategies to improve forage use in beef cattle


Researcher: Gabriel Rib Funding: $30,000 Increasing fibre digestibility can help reduce costs and increase beef sustainability. Even in feedlots, forages still account for 80% of the total feed. Earlier research projects have shown that cattle which had the highest ability to digest fibre also ate more, which could then in turn increase their aberage daily gain.
This research project, led by the Beef Industry Research Chair Dr. Gabriel Riberio, will compare the growth performance of weaned cales with a higher ability to digest fibre. Calves with the highest and lowest fibre digestibility will be compared by evaluating their rumens. They will attempt to find biological markers, before confirming their hypothesis with a larger study.




2020-106: Sulfate removal from agricultural ponds for improved cattle health: evaluating regional and local controls


Researcher: Kerri Finlay Funding: $30,000 Previous research projects studying dugouts in Saskatchewan found that 1/4 had poor quality, while another 10% were unsuitable for livestock. This result could be show increasingly poor quality due to drought conditions. Past work, however, also noted that recharge ponds have lower sulfate levels, and respond differently to climate changes.
Dr. Kerri Finlay and her research team will investigate how sulfates enter agriculture ponds and dugots. This includes understanding how riprian and floating plants can mitigate or bioremdiate water contaminants, as well as whether they can be planted for this purpose. Dugout dreging will also be evaluated. Finally, the team will conduct an economic evaluation to provide comprehensive recommendations for Saskatchewan producers.





2019-114: A screen for drugs that reveal Mycoplasma bovis to the bovine immune system


Researcher: Antonio Ruzzini Funding: $24,200 A successful treatment for Mycoplasma Bovis has evaded us for some time. This novel research, led by Dr. Tony Ruzzini, will study proteins released from the bacterial membrane of this disease, and use available drugs to determine if they can disrupt them, essentially removing the "cloak" that makes its treatment so difficult.




2019-006: Genomic epidemiology and rapid detection of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis infections (Johne’s disease) in Saskatchewan cattle


Researcher: Andrew Cameron Funding: $50,000 Johne’s disease reduces the ability for an animal’s intestines to absorb nutrients, causing weight loss, diarrhea, and eventually death. There are no vaccines available or effective drugs to treat animals with this Johne’s, though there are international trade risks associated with this disease. The current tests available for Johne's disease provide false positives, and are not able to detect it until the onset of the disease's symptoms. Detecting the specific pathogen is also a challenge. This study will find the DNA of various Johne's disease strains, and then develop a rapid, accurate, and cost effective diagnostic tool.




2018-135:  Comparison of immune response & respiratory disease sparing effect of homologous & heterologous vaccine programs in neonatal calves


Researcher: Nathan Erickson Funding: $17,250 Respiratory disease control research is a major priority for the SCA Board and Research Committee. This project will investigate the best vaccination protocol, based on the vaccines that are already commercially available. It will also note if different forms of vaccines (intranasal priming vaccines with injectable booster vaccines) would be more effective than either intranasal or injectable vaccine protocols alone.




2018-137:  Treatment guidance for Bovine respiratory disease: Optimizing prudent and economical antimicrobial decision making.


Researcher: John Campbell Funding: $23,000 Medicating cattle with effective antibiotics helps reduce treatment times and costs. However, producers do not often know precisely what pathogens are affecting cattle. This research will investigate if calves can be swabbed on arrival at feedlots, and the chances that they will later be ill from the same pathogens detected. It will also determine if the most common bacteria detected would affect the whole herd, and if a small sample could predict the illnesses for the entire pen.




2018-138:  Managing calves before arrival at the feedlot to reduce infectious disease, antimicrobial use & resistance: What is it worth & An Interactive Tool to Inform Johne’s Disease Control in Beef Herds: What Test, When and How Often


Researcher: Cheryl Waldner Funding: $4,888 Dynamic computer models can assess a number of different management practices, and have been used to determine best practices to achieve water quality, medical practices, and oil and gas refineries. The purchase of the dynamic modelling computer allows researchers to assess different management practices on cow-calf farms, and their impacts on treatment rates for disease, antibiotic use, resistance, and costs of production for the feedlots. It will also be used to further investigate best practices surrounding Johne’s disease.




2018-136: Use of bacteriophage-derived lysins in combatting multi-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens that cause bovine respiratory disease (BRD)


Researcher: Dongyan Niu Funding: $45,774 1) Engineer a part of the bacteriophage (bacteria-killing viruses) to specifically attack the most drug-resistant pathogens.
2)Antimicrobial resistance is increasing, and it is difficult to treat some bacteria common in bovine respiratory disease.
2) There has been success in mice and humans.




2017-147:  Mycoplasma bovis antimicrobial resistance determination by MALDI-TOF MS: feasibility and practical application pilot study.


Researcher: Murray Jelinksi Funding: $18,170 Veterinarians conduct tests to determine if the samples of bacteria will be affected by antibiotics. There are several tests already available, but faster tests to make this information more available will help provide answers more efficiently for beef producers, especially with M. Bovis bacteria which often mutate quickly. This study will determine the effectiveness of 3 different tests for antimicrobial resistance, one of which is the MALDI-TOF test. The researchers hope to provide a larger, more practical system available to more vets and their clients.




2017-146:  Enhanced Vaccine Adjuvant Platform for Nasal Administration in Livestock


Researcher: Ellen Wasan Funding: $50,000 Currently, nasal vaccines are not effective for newborn calves, as the maternal antibodies normally counteract its effectiveness. This adjuvant (or a substance that enhances a body's immune system to an antigen) would make these vaccines suitable for maternal immunization, and highly effective in newborn calves. Trials will start in the lab, and then move on to mice, pigs, and then cattle for this 3-year study.




2017-145:  Alternative Trace Mineral Supplementation Strategies for Improved Cow Performance


Researcher: Bart Lardner Funding: $30,000 Trace mineral intake can vary when they are available as free-choice to a herd. These minerals can e vitally important in order to prevent a wreck. To determine the value of injectable versions of trace minerals, 200 cows at the new Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence and 200 cows in Guelph, Ontario will be provided various sources of trace minerals, and measured for their reproductive response.




2017-094:  Development of a novel vaccine for protection against Mycoplasma bovis infections in feedlot cattle


Researcher: Jose Perez-Casal Funding: $149,788 Mycoplasma bovis is a pathogen causing respiratory disease and arthritis, among other problems. It is increasingly recognized as having an important impact on the health, welfare, and productivity of dairy and beef cattle. M. bovis diseases can be difficult to diagnose and control because of inconsistent disease expression and response to treatments and vaccines. Dr. Perez-Casal will test novel vaccine candidates against an M. Bovis challenge. This approach has already been successful in Sub-Sahara Africa against Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia.




2016-186: Effect of Ergot on Beef Bull Fertility


Reseacher: Jaswant SIngh Funding: $28,980 The effect of ergot on cattle has been studied in the past. Beef nutritionists feel comfortable
providing their cattle with a low level of ergot in feed, while higher levels of ergot can lead to large wrecks. However, Dr. Singh and his team are investigating whether even these low levels of ergot can lead to poor fertility for bulls in the year that they eat ergot and beyond. They hope to provide better recommendations to bovine nutritionists with this information, which could lead to higher fertility rates in years after ergot contaminated crops.




2016-084: A field comparison of intranasal versus injectible BRD vaccination on beef calf titres, ADG, morbidity and mortality


Researcher: Nathan Erickson Funding: $15,000 Beef producers have several vaccination choices when ensuring the health of their animals. However, concerns about efficacy have been raised, which is further complicated by various protocols recommended for each type of vaccine. Given new information available on the Bovine Viral Disease, these researchers wanted to compare live modified, nasal injectable protocols to traditional injectable vaccines and their protocols.




2020-111: Enhancing diagnostic methods for rapid and accurate detection of macrolide resistance in Mannheimia haemolytica


Researcher: Janelt Hill Funding: $20,000 Antimicrobial resistance is already an issue for beef cattle, and there is evidence of new mechanisms in the Mannheimia bacteria indicating creating additional new resistance. As Mannheimia haemolytica is resistant to the most commonly used antibitoics within the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex, more analysis to curtail this problem is essential.
Dr. Janet Hill and her team will sample 800 calves on arrival into the LFCE feedlot for two years, so that they can sequence the bacteria shown to have resistance.
While the application of this research is long-term, understanding antimicrobial resistance in a large scale will generate a much more comprehensive understanding of this problem.




2020-109: Using watering bowls to monitor the respiratory bacterial resistome in cattle by location and time within the feedlot


Researcher: Murray Jelinski Funding: $22,5000 Antimicrobial resistance is an increasingly alarming risk. Treatments for sick cattle, without knowing for certain what is causing their illness, increases resistance on farms, which then necessitates a search for other more useful drugs. It could also lead to greater beef mortality.
Easy, cost effective methods to determine which diseases are prevalent in a feedlot, as well as the drugs that will be most useful, would allow producers to target problems quickly.
Dr. Murray Jelinski will investigate how bacteria change at waterbowls over time, and note if there are any "hot spots" in the pen which could increase antimicrobial resistance. This will set up more information and resources for future projects that will note methods to prevent and treat diseases more effectively.




2020-107: Towards 1-step testing – rapid identification of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) viruses to inform vaccine use & development


Researcher: Cheryl Waldner Funding: $25,000 Bovine respiratory disease is a complex that mostly affects incoming feedlot calves. While a great deal of research has focused on the bacterial contributions, viral contributions are equally important.
Automate sequencing and bioinformatics will be used for viral BRD to reduce time and costs. The research team will also note potential of sequencing infections on arrival at feedlots, then evaluate the effectiveness of cow/calf vaccines arriving at feedlot. This in turn will help them determine the need for vaccine/protocol updates.
Ultimately, this research team, lead by Cheryl Waldner, hopes to provide 1-step rapid identification of known and emerging BRD viruses, in order to quickly and effectively treat this disease complex. Treating animals for the right infection at the right time ultimately will help reduce costs, and improve animal welfare.





2019-114: A screen for drugs that reveal Mycoplasma bovis to the bovine immune system


Researcher: Antonio Ruzzini Funding: $24,200 A successful treatment for Mycoplasma Bovis has evaded us for some time. This novel research, led by Dr. Tony Ruzzini, will study proteins released from the bacterial membrane of this disease, and use available drugs to determine if they can disrupt them, essentially removing the "cloak" that makes its treatment so difficult.




2019-006: Genomic epidemiology and rapid detection of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis infections (Johne’s disease) in Saskatchewan cattle


Researcher: Andrew Cameron Funding: $50,000 Johne’s disease reduces the ability for an animal’s intestines to absorb nutrients, causing weight loss, diarrhea, and eventually death. There are no vaccines available or effective drugs to treat animals with this Johne’s, though there are international trade risks associated with this disease. The current tests available for Johne's disease provide false positives, and are not able to detect it until the onset of the disease's symptoms. Detecting the specific pathogen is also a challenge. This study will find the DNA of various Johne's disease strains, and then develop a rapid, accurate, and cost effective diagnostic tool.




2018-135:  Comparison of immune response & respiratory disease sparing effect of homologous & heterologous vaccine programs in neonatal calves


Researcher: Nathan Erickson Funding: $17,250 Respiratory disease control research is a major priority for the SCA Board and Research Committee. This project will investigate the best vaccination protocol, based on the vaccines that are already commercially available. It will also note if different forms of vaccines (intranasal priming vaccines with injectable booster vaccines) would be more effective than either intranasal or injectable vaccine protocols alone.




2018-137:  Treatment guidance for Bovine respiratory disease: Optimizing prudent and economical antimicrobial decision making.


Researcher: John Campbell Funding: $23,000 Medicating cattle with effective antibiotics helps reduce treatment times and costs. However, producers do not often know precisely what pathogens are affecting cattle. This research will investigate if calves can be swabbed on arrival at feedlots, and the chances that they will later be ill from the same pathogens detected. It will also determine if the most common bacteria detected would affect the whole herd, and if a small sample could predict the illnesses for the entire pen.




2018-138:  Managing calves before arrival at the feedlot to reduce infectious disease, antimicrobial use & resistance: What is it worth & An Interactive Tool to Inform Johne’s Disease Control in Beef Herds: What Test, When and How Often


Researcher: Cheryl Waldner Funding: $4,888 Dynamic computer models can assess a number of different management practices, and have been used to determine best practices to achieve water quality, medical practices, and oil and gas refineries. The purchase of the dynamic modelling computer allows researchers to assess different management practices on cow-calf farms, and their impacts on treatment rates for disease, antibiotic use, resistance, and costs of production for the feedlots. It will also be used to further investigate best practices surrounding Johne’s disease.




2018-136: Use of bacteriophage-derived lysins in combatting multi-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens that cause bovine respiratory disease (BRD)


Researcher: Dongyan Niu Funding: $45,774 1) Engineer a part of the bacteriophage (bacteria-killing viruses) to specifically attack the most drug-resistant pathogens.
2)Antimicrobial resistance is increasing, and it is difficult to treat some bacteria common in bovine respiratory disease.
2) There has been success in mice and humans.




2017-147:  Mycoplasma bovis antimicrobial resistance determination by MALDI-TOF MS: feasibility and practical application pilot study.


Researcher: Murray Jelinksi Funding: $18,170 Veterinarians conduct tests to determine if the samples of bacteria will be affected by antibiotics. There are several tests already available, but faster tests to make this information more available will help provide answers more efficiently for beef producers, especially with M. Bovis bacteria which often mutate quickly. This study will determine the effectiveness of 3 different tests for antimicrobial resistance, one of which is the MALDI-TOF test. The researchers hope to provide a larger, more practical system available to more vets and their clients.




2017-146:  Enhanced Vaccine Adjuvant Platform for Nasal Administration in Livestock


Researcher: Ellen Wasan Funding: $50,000 Currently, nasal vaccines are not effective for newborn calves, as the maternal antibodies normally counteract its effectiveness. This adjuvant (or a substance that enhances a body's immune system to an antigen) would make these vaccines suitable for maternal immunization, and highly effective in newborn calves. Trials will start in the lab, and then move on to mice, pigs, and then cattle for this 3-year study.




2017-145:  Alternative Trace Mineral Supplementation Strategies for Improved Cow Performance


Researcher: Bart Lardner Funding: $30,000 Trace mineral intake can vary when they are available as free-choice to a herd. These minerals can e vitally important in order to prevent a wreck. To determine the value of injectable versions of trace minerals, 200 cows at the new Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence and 200 cows in Guelph, Ontario will be provided various sources of trace minerals, and measured for their reproductive response.




2017-094:  Development of a novel vaccine for protection against Mycoplasma bovis infections in feedlot cattle


Researcher: Jose Perez-Casal Funding: $149,788 Mycoplasma bovis is a pathogen causing respiratory disease and arthritis, among other problems. It is increasingly recognized as having an important impact on the health, welfare, and productivity of dairy and beef cattle. M. bovis diseases can be difficult to diagnose and control because of inconsistent disease expression and response to treatments and vaccines. Dr. Perez-Casal will test novel vaccine candidates against an M. Bovis challenge. This approach has already been successful in Sub-Sahara Africa against Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia.




2016-186: Effect of Ergot on Beef Bull Fertility


Reseacher: Jaswant SIngh Funding: $28,980 The effect of ergot on cattle has been studied in the past. Beef nutritionists feel comfortable
providing their cattle with a low level of ergot in feed, while higher levels of ergot can lead to large wrecks. However, Dr. Singh and his team are investigating whether even these low levels of ergot can lead to poor fertility for bulls in the year that they eat ergot and beyond. They hope to provide better recommendations to bovine nutritionists with this information, which could lead to higher fertility rates in years after ergot contaminated crops.




2016-084: A field comparison of intranasal versus injectible BRD vaccination on beef calf titres, ADG, morbidity and mortality


Researcher: Nathan Erickson Funding: $15,000 Beef producers have several vaccination choices when ensuring the health of their animals. However, concerns about efficacy have been raised, which is further complicated by various protocols recommended for each type of vaccine. Given new information available on the Bovine Viral Disease, these researchers wanted to compare live modified, nasal injectable protocols to traditional injectable vaccines and their protocols.




2020-111: Enhancing diagnostic methods for rapid and accurate detection of macrolide resistance in Mannheimia haemolytica


Researcher: Janelt Hill Funding: $20,000 Antimicrobial resistance is already an issue for beef cattle, and there is evidence of new mechanisms in the Mannheimia bacteria indicating creating additional new resistance. As Mannheimia haemolytica is resistant to the most commonly used antibitoics within the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex, more analysis to curtail this problem is essential.
Dr. Janet Hill and her team will sample 800 calves on arrival into the LFCE feedlot for two years, so that they can sequence the bacteria shown to have resistance.
While the application of this research is long-term, understanding antimicrobial resistance in a large scale will generate a much more comprehensive understanding of this problem.




2020-109: Using watering bowls to monitor the respiratory bacterial resistome in cattle by location and time within the feedlot


Researcher: Murray Jelinski Funding: $22,5000 Antimicrobial resistance is an increasingly alarming risk. Treatments for sick cattle, without knowing for certain what is causing their illness, increases resistance on farms, which then necessitates a search for other more useful drugs. It could also lead to greater beef mortality.
Easy, cost effective methods to determine which diseases are prevalent in a feedlot, as well as the drugs that will be most useful, would allow producers to target problems quickly.
Dr. Murray Jelinski will investigate how bacteria change at waterbowls over time, and note if there are any "hot spots" in the pen which could increase antimicrobial resistance. This will set up more information and resources for future projects that will note methods to prevent and treat diseases more effectively.




2020-107: Towards 1-step testing – rapid identification of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) viruses to inform vaccine use & development


Researcher: Cheryl Waldner Funding: $25,000 Bovine respiratory disease is a complex that mostly affects incoming feedlot calves. While a great deal of research has focused on the bacterial contributions, viral contributions are equally important.
Automate sequencing and bioinformatics will be used for viral BRD to reduce time and costs. The research team will also note potential of sequencing infections on arrival at feedlots, then evaluate the effectiveness of cow/calf vaccines arriving at feedlot. This in turn will help them determine the need for vaccine/protocol updates.
Ultimately, this research team, lead by Cheryl Waldner, hopes to provide 1-step rapid identification of known and emerging BRD viruses, in order to quickly and effectively treat this disease complex. Treating animals for the right infection at the right time ultimately will help reduce costs, and improve animal welfare.